POGOS: Faith Glavey Pawl on Liturgy & Children


This week in Pogos we welcome Dr Faith Glavey Pawl to the podcast as she walks us through her recent work on the importance of children for the philosophy of liturgy.

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Dr Faith Glavey Pawl has been teaching philosophy at the University of St. Thomas, Minnesota, since 2008, where she primarily teaches Ethics.  She received her PhD from Saint Louis University in 2014, where she wrote a dissertation under Eleonore Stump on animal suffering as part of the problem of evil. Her current researches ask questions about animals and the environment in the light of Christian philosophical theology   She also writes about resources in medieval philosophy, especially in Aquinas, for addressing questions about environmental values.  She is a member of the Executive committee of the Society of Christian Philosophers.

 

Jonathan C Rutledge is executive producer and host of the Logos Institute’s official podcast, Pogos, as well as its blog, creatively-dubbed Blogos. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of Oklahoma, where he studied under Linda T. Zagzebski, and he holds a Ph.D. in divinity from the University of St Andrews where he studied under Alan J. Torrance. He currently serves as a research fellow at the Logos Institute, and his primary academic interests lie in the areas of epistemology, philosophy of religion, and systematic & analytic theology. His current projects include a monograph on the nature of forgiveness & a sacrificial model of atonement, philosophical Arminianism as an account of divine creation, and constructing a Foley-inspired account of epistemic rationality & defeat. His favorite pastime involves walking on the East Sands with his son, Caspian, and spouse, Bethany.

 


Christa L McKirland
is also a producer and co-host of
Pogos as well as a Research Fellow in the Logos Institute. Her research proposes a pneumatologically-Christocentric anthropology based upon the significance and uniqueness of the fundamental human need for intentional dependence upon the divine presence.